The Postwoman Movie

ROMANTIC DRAMA FEATURED IN THE HUFFINGTON POST IN PRE-PRODUCTION

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Screenwriter and Director, JD Walker, thanks all of the supporters who donated to a successful Kickstarter Campaign for THE POSTWOMAN MOVIE. 

Thank you! We’re still accepting donations and offering rewards on our website: http://www.thepostwomanmovie.com 

Help Get THE POSTWOMAN Movie Raise Production Expenses.


THE POSTWOMAN follows the story of a struggling single mother who, after being laid off from her position at a post office, gains her independence when she is forced to confront her husband and two young daughters about her secret life with another woman. The family drama showcases the complex and courageous act it takes to combat homophobia, racism, sexism, and the fear of the unknown. This love story is about faith and endurance. It champions healthy LGBT families (and their allies) who are thriving by chronicling the journey of a mother and daughter who come to terms with each other’s choices. Set in an independent Bay Area bookstore, which is threatened to close due to the unstable economy, THE POSTWOMAN humanizes women of color who are raising healthy families and shows that unconditional love is truly the conduit and the catalyst that can change all. The Kickstarter for the feature film ends Tuesday, August 6, 2013.

THE POSTWOMAN is written by J.D. Walker, PHD, a Sundance Film Festival Pitching Contest Winner. The screenplay earned Honorable Mention in Sundance’s Table Read My Screenplay Contest, Finalist mention in the Hollywood Black Film Festival’s Storytelling Competition, and Semi-Finalist in the LA Femme Film Festival Screenplay Competition. Walker will write and direct the film. Trevite Willis will produce. The film stars Margaret Kemp and Van Brown from the feature film “Children of God”; familiar stars from Cheryl Dunye’s films, inlcuding Ignacio Rivera and Skyler Cooper; as well as Eden Duncan-Smith from Broadway’s The Lion King, Tracie Collins, Evita Castine, Jessica Holter, Mahsin Munir, Tish McCullough, and Anika Bobb.

"Noticing the lack of films about queer African-American women, Sundance Film Festival pitching contest winner J.D. Walker has decided to take it upon herself to make her own film, ‘The Postwoman,’ about a woman coming to terms with her sexuality while trying to escape her abusive past."-
-Christopher Rudolph, THE HUFFINGTON POST

To learn more and to donate visit: http://www.thepostwomanmovie.com 

Join us online! 

http://twitter.com/PostwomanMovie

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Ignacio Rivera, who stars as the Postwoman’s lover, in our feature film explains why you should support THE POSTWOMAN MOVIE

Help Get THE POSTWOMAN Movie Raise Production Expenses.


THE POSTWOMAN follows the story of a struggling single mother who, after being laid off from her position at a post office, gains her independence when she is forced to confront her husband and two young daughters about her secret life with another woman. The family drama showcases the complex and courageous act it takes to combat homophobia, racism, sexism, and the fear of the unknown. This love story is about faith and endurance. It champions healthy LGBT families (and their allies) who are thriving by chronicling the journey of a mother and daughter who come to terms with each other’s choices. Set in an independent Bay Area bookstore, which is threatened to close due to the unstable economy, THE POSTWOMAN humanizes women of color who are raising healthy families and shows that unconditional love is truly the conduit and the catalyst that can change all. The Kickstarter for the feature film ends Tuesday, August 6, 2013.

THE POSTWOMAN is written by J.D. Walker, PHD, a Sundance Film Festival Pitching Contest Winner. The screenplay earned Honorable Mention in Sundance’s Table Read My Screenplay Contest, Finalist mention in the Hollywood Black Film Festival’s Storytelling Competition, and Semi-Finalist in the LA Femme Film Festival Screenplay Competition. Walker will write and direct the film. Trevite Willis will produce. The film stars Margaret Kemp and Van Brown from the feature film “Children of God”; familiar stars from Cheryl Dunye’s films, inlcuding Ignacio Rivera and Skyler Cooper; as well as Eden Duncan-Smith from Broadway’s The Lion King, Tracie Collins, Evita Castine, Jessica Holter, Mahsin Munir, Tish McCullough, and Anika Bobb.

"Noticing the lack of films about queer African-American women, Sundance Film Festival pitching contest winner J.D. Walker has decided to take it upon herself to make her own film, ‘The Postwoman,’ about a woman coming to terms with her sexuality while trying to escape her abusive past."-
-Christopher Rudolph, THE HUFFINGTON POST

To learn more and to donate visit: http://www.thepostwomanmovie.com 

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We were successful on Kickstarter Campaign for THE POSTWOMAN MOVIE! However, we are still accepting donations to The Postwoman Movie online at http:/www.thepostwomanmovie.com.

DONATE here.

Take a look at our final push video above on kicskatarter for The Postwoman, which, in the past week, was featured in The Huffington Post, Shadow and Act, Afterellen.com, ElixHer, Film Courage and numerous other blogs..

Help Get THE POSTWOMAN Movie Raise Production Expenses.


THE POSTWOMAN follows the story of a struggling single mother who, after being laid off from her position at a post office, gains her independence when she is forced to confront her husband and two young daughters about her secret life with another woman. The family drama showcases the complex and courageous act it takes to combat homophobia, racism, sexism, and the fear of the unknown. This love story is about faith and endurance. It champions healthy LGBT families (and their allies) who are thriving by chronicling the journey of a mother and daughter who come to terms with each other’s choices. Set in an independent Bay Area bookstore, which is threatened to close due to the unstable economy, THE POSTWOMAN humanizes women of color who are raising healthy families and shows that unconditional love is truly the conduit and the catalyst that can change all. The Kickstarter for the feature film ends Tuesday, August 6, 2013.

THE POSTWOMAN is written by J.D. Walker, PHD, a Sundance Film Festival Pitching Contest Winner. The screenplay earned Honorable Mention in Sundance’s Table Read My Screenplay Contest, Finalist mention in the Hollywood Black Film Festival’s Storytelling Competition, and Semi-Finalist in the LA Femme Film Festival Screenplay Competition. Walker will write and direct the film. Trevite Willis will produce. The film stars Margaret Kemp and Van Brown from the feature film “Children of God”; familiar stars from Cheryl Dunye’s films, inlcuding Ignacio Rivera and Skyler Cooper; as well as Eden Duncan-Smith from Broadway’s The Lion King, Tracie Collins, Evita Castine, Jessica Holter, Mahsin Munir, Tish McCullough, and Anika Bobb.

"Noticing the lack of films about queer African-American women, Sundance Film Festival pitching contest winner J.D. Walker has decided to take it upon herself to make her own film, ‘The Postwoman,’ about a woman coming to terms with her sexuality while trying to escape her abusive past."-
-Christopher Rudolph, THE HUFFINGTON POST

To learn more and to donate visit: http://www.thepostwomanmovie.com 

Thanks for your support. Join us on twitter: http://twitter.com/PostwomanMovie

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Sundance Pitching Contest Winner, JD Walker, is raising production expenses on Kickstarter for THE POSTWOMAN MOVIE (2014), a romantic drama about a single mom who develops the courage to confront her children and dysfunctional family about her secret life with another woman. In this video, visual artist Corinna Nicole explains why she supports The Postwoman and is donating her paintings to the project.


Find out more: http://kck.st/15IhO4r 

Official Site: http://www.thepostwomanmovie.com
Twitter: http://twitter.com/PostwomanMovie

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The Postwoman Movie Announces 30 Day Kickstarter Campaign

SUPPORT US ON KICKSTARTER: http://kck.st/15IhO4r

San Francisco, CA (July 1, 2013) - JD Publishing Group, LLC launched the Kickstarter Campaign for the romantic drama, THE POSTWOMAN. Written and Directed by J.D. Walker, THE POSTWOMAN tells the story of a struggling African American single mother whose life is turned upside down when she is forced to confront her husband and two young daughters about her secret life with another woman. The feature script for the romantic drama, which earned Honorable Mention in Sundance’s Table Read My Screenplay Contest as well as Finalist in the Hollywood Black Film Festival’s Storytelling Competition, launches its Kickstarter campaign June 10, 2013 (approximately one week before Gay Pride festivals around the country).

THE POSTWOMAN will mark the debut feature from J.D. Publishing Group, a media-arts based organization based in the San Francisco Bay Area dedicated to quality social justice films which emanate from the Black experience.

The family oriented film not only chronicles the psychological journey of straight spouses of color who develop the courage to come out to their children, but it also chronicles the children of gay parents, who are often marginalized and impacted by divorce.

THE POSTWOMAN is an original screenplay written and directed by J.D. Walker who also won the pitching contest at this year’s Sundance Film Festival for her second feature, a biopic set in Chicago. Trevite Willis and Isis Arare will produce. The film stars Margaret Kemp, Ignacio Sanchez, Van Brown, Eden Duncan-Smith, Evita Marie Castine, Kathleen Antonia, Mahasin Munir, and Tracie Collins.

The 30-day Kickstarter campaign, which began in July ends August 6, 2013. The group aims to raise $25,000 for production expenses to begin filming. The rewards include a DVD of the film, advanced tickets to screenings, and an original oil painting of Zora Neale Hurston, novelist of the Harlem Renaissance. The Kickstarter Campaign can be accessed at http://www.kickstarter.com/profile/postwomanmovie . The Twitter page is @PostwomanMovie and the Official Website is http://www.thepostwomanmovie.com.

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Not a Single Story: African American Writers on the Pulse of Morning

      

                             Screenplay Semi-Finalists and Finalists at HBFF.

From L to R: Malcolm Rector, Regina Junior, Manny Johnson, JD Walker, Corey Moore, and Eric Richardson.

It’s been an eventful weekend at the Hollywood Black Film Festival (October 24-28, 2012) where writers from around the country convened at the W Hotel to showcase their films, feature length screenplays, or works in progress. 

I was glad to be included, as a semi-finalist, for my first feature script “The Postwoman,” a story that deals with the inextricable link between gender, race, class, and sexuality, and shows how one mother’s decision to create her own “alternative” family impacts her entire family.

As part of being accepted into the festival, I was granted a VIP pass to the festival and the opportunity to participate in a four hour workshop with all of the screenplay finalists.

The finalists included a brilliant writer from Arkansas by the name of  Regina Junior whose screenplay revolved around the lives of two notable football players who come to grips with their relationship after a tragic car accident (Regina Junior is the winner of the Screenplay competition); a writer and professor based in Texas by the name of Malcolm Rector whose screenplay, “Raped,” explores the first few minutes after such a horrific event; and another gifted writer with rich Southern themes by the name of Corey Moore whose screenplay, full of folklore and its own unique speech idiom, was entitled “Blu’s Country.” 

                             

Three semi-finalists were selected to participate in the Storyteller workshop with the finalists: myself, JD Walker, writer and director of The Postwoman; a talented writer by the name of Leslie from New York who possessed numerous story ideas and whose emerging TV pilot is entitled “Lear”; Eric Richardson, whose screenplay was not only selected as a semi-finalist, but whose short film “Bubble Gum” was also selected to be included in the Film Festival; and Manny Johnson, the impressive and extremely resourceful writer of a screenplay called “Underbelly.”

The screenwriting workshop was led by Harrison Reiner, a CBS staffer, who previously was production executive on the Academy Award-winning film, CINEMA PARADISO. For over 11 years, Reiner has been instrumental in nurturing the screenplay development of all of the Storyteller finalists at the Hollywood Black Film Festival. His notes on our feature scripts and, more importantly, his ability to empower us and engage us about the motivation for our ideas and other feature scripts was extremely valuable. I look forward to being mentored by Harrison. He is generous, thoughtful, down to earth, and resourceful. 

I am glad that my pitches, which were shared with Harrison, were celebrated and highly praised. That means, I need to get back to those scripts and finish them quickly. :)

       

Perhaps what is most interesting about being included in this celebrated Storyteller Workshop is that all of the writers who were included were engaged in deconstructing myths about the African American experience.  We were tired of seeing the “single story” about African American culture or life on the silver screen; that is, a limited and narrow perspective on African American culture and life that restricts or binds our subjects, flattening their experience in this battlefield called life.  We wrote because we wanted to shift the discourse about our incredibly complex characters whose lives or experiences were not stereotypical — not bound by a western worldview or perspective. 

By creating complex characters, rich with African history, we celebrate our own culture, dialect, speech rhythms, cadences, and euphemisms. 

In “Understanding the New Black Poetry,” Stephen Henderson informs us of the “jazz elements” inherent within African American poetry, elements comprised of signifying, improvisation, and “worrying the line,” to name a few. These unique elements can also be found in the writing of established and emerging Black screenwriters.  Gratefully, the Hollywood Black Film Festival celebrates both.  To an outsider, who might not find these elements in our stories unique, they are meaningless and to be quickly discarded; largely, because they do not uphold popular myths or stereotypes about our culture which is often perpetuated in the media, in the literary canon, and in Hollywood. To an outsider, who is only in the business of upholding the status quo or one single stereotypical story, our multilayered and complex stories, influenced by our diverse background, journey, or vision, may seem invalid. 

Indeed, this is why writers of the African diaspora must continue write — to establish balance in the literary world and on the big screen. We must reject popular myths, resist popular stereotypes about our people, and dig deeper to present to the world a universal “human” story, one that is richly complex and allows for the diversity of our spirit and unique cultural perspective. We must be allowed to write what Langston Hughes in “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain” calls “free within ourselves” — unashamed and unabashed about our rich African history and culture. 

This, of course, is where the demand for more Black critics, storytellers, film festival judges, and script consultants comes in. It is also where critics and storyteller consultants, who are open to deconstructing such richness and complexity, shine. Alain Locke, a philosopher and scholar from Howard University, my alma mater, called for the need for “mutual understanding between the races” in his text, “The New Negro.” Indeed, all voices and experiences should be represented in the literary playing field and on the big screen. And where our stories are not represented, we, as writers, must create them, beckoning other writers behind us and those who are still not born to pick up the torch … and resist. 

       

                                With Manny Johnson, writer of “Underbelly”

This morning, I am standing on the shoulders of several literary giants and screenwriters who have gone before me. And I know it. I watch Ava DuVernay trailblazing in the independent film world, setting a path for all of us, creating her own distribution model while lifting as she climbs. Like several Black screenwriters and directors who have gone before her, she resists the popular myth of a single story about our existence. “Middle of Nowhere,” for instance, is richly complex. It’s beautiful and lyrical — not just another prison story about a drug dealer or violent felon. We delve deep into the psychology of her working class heroine who experiences her own “dark night of the soul” after witnessing a loved one within the prison industrial complex.  DuVernay places the experiences of women into the forefront in her films. They are no longer marginal, voiceless characters, or objects. Rather, they are multilayered and complex. They have voice, vision, and agency. 

Last night, while doing some research on “Half of a Yellow Sun" (2013), an upcoming movie based on the novel by Chimamanda Adichie, I discovered this speech she delivered called "The Danger of a Single Story" and knew I had to share it with a much larger audience.

I think all of us should watch this video below over and over until we have learned the lesson: there is no single story. Our lives are far more complex and, as writers, filmmakers, producers, and critics, we must never forget. 

———

ABOUT THE WRITER: 

JD Walker is the writer and director of the upcoming romantic drama, “The Postwoman,” which earned a Finalist mention at the LA Femme Film Festival (October 11-14, 2012) and a Semi-Finalist mention at the Hollywood Black Film Festival for the feature script. A Kickstarter campaign for her debut feature launches this Fall. Star the project now on Kickstarter by clicking on the following link: 

http://www.kickstarter.com/profile/postwomanmovie

Follow us on Twitter:  http://twitter.com/PostwomanMovie

A graduate of San Francisco State and Howard University, JD was a Theater major in undergrad and an English major in Grad School. She has an extensive background in publishing, sales and marketing, having worked for several years in the Marketing and Editorial Department at a University Press and having served as a Trade Book Buyer for the Howard University Bookstore. Walker has not only worked with and served on panels with numerous African American poets and writers, but has also written countless feature stories on poets and writers for leading Black newspapers and magazines.  She is currently completing two other screenplays while preparing for pre-production on The Postwoman. 

Filed under Hollywood Black Film Festival Black writers Independent Black film

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102 Resources for Fiction Writers

ruthlesscalculus:

Are you still stuck for ideas for National Novel Writing Month? Or are you working on a novel at a more leisurely pace? Here are 102 resources on Character, Point of View, Dialogue, Plot, Conflict, Structure, Outlining, Setting, and World Building, plus some links to generate Ideas and Inspiration.

CHARACTER, POINT OF VIEW, DIALOGUE

10 Days of Character Building

Name Generators

Name Playground

The Universal Mary Sue Litmus Test

Priming the idea pump (A character checklist shamlessly lifted from acting)

How to Create a Character

Seven Common Character Types

Handling a Cast of Thousands – Part I: Getting to Know Your Characters

It’s Not What They Say …

Establishing the Right Point of View: How to Avoid “Stepping Out of Character”

How to Start Writing in the Third Person

Web Resources for Developing Characters

What are the Sixteen Master Archetypes?

Character: A compilation of guidance from classical and contemporary experts on creating great dramatic characters

Building Fictional Characters

Fiction Writer’s Character Chart

Character Building Workshop

Tips for Characterization

Fiction Writer’s Character Chart

Villains are People, Too, But …

Top 10 Tips for Writing Dialogue

Speaking of Dialogue

Dialogue Tips

Advantages, Disadvantages and Skills (character traits)

How to Write a Character Bible

Character Development Exercises

All Your Characters Sounds the Same — And They’re Not a Hivemind!

Medieval Names Archive

Sympathy Without Saintliness

Writing the Other: Bridging Cultural Difference for Successful Fiction

Family Echo (family tree website)

Interviewing Characters: Follow the Energy

100 Character Development Questions for Writers

Behind the Name

Lineage Chart Layout Generator

PLOT, CONFLICT, STRUCTURE, OUTLINE

How to Write a Novel: The Snowflake Method

Effectively Outlining Your Plot

Conflict and Character within Story Structure

Outlining Your Plot

Ideas, Plots & Using the Premise Sheets

How to Write a Novel

Creating Conflict and Sustaining Suspense

Plunge Right In … Into Your Story, That Is!

Fiction Writing Tips: Story Grid

Tips for Creating a Compelling Plot

Writer’s “Cheat Sheets”

The Thirty-six (plus one) Dramatic Situations

The Evil Overlord Devises a Plot: Excerpt from Stupid Plotting Tricks

Conflict Test

What is Conflict?

Monomyth

The Hero’s Journey: Summary of the Steps

Outline Your Novel in Thirty Minutes

Plotting Without Fears

Novel Outlining 101

Writing the Perfect Scene

Fight Scenes 101

Basic Plots in Literature

One-Page Plotting

The Great Swampy Middle

SETTING, WORLD BUILDING

Magical World Builder’s Guide

I Love the End of the World

World Building 101

The Art of Description: Eight Tips to Help You Bring Your Settings to Life

Creating the Perfect Setting – Part I

Creating a Believable World

An Impatient Writer’s Approach to Worldbuilding

Fantasy Worldbuilding Questions

Setting

Character and Setting Interactions

Creating Fantasy and Science Fiction Worlds

Creating Fantasy Worlds

Questions About Worldbuilding

Maps Workshop — Developing the Fictional World Through Mapping

World Builder Projects

IDEAS, INSPIRATION

Quick Story Idea Generator

Solve Your Problems Simply by Saying Them Out Loud

Busting Your Writing Rut

Writing Inspiration, or Sex on a Bicycle

Creative Acceleration: 11 Tips to Engineer a Productive Flow

The Seven Major Beginner Mistakes

Complete Your First Book with these 9 Simple Writing Habits

Free Association, Active Imagination, Twilight Imaging

Random Book Title Generator

Finishing Your Novel

Story Starters and Idea Generators

REVISION

How to Rewrite

One-Pass Manuscript Revision: From First Draft to Last in One Cycle

Editing Recipe

Cliche Finder

Revising Your Novel: Read What You’ve Written

Writing 101: So You Want to Write a Novel Part 3: Revising a Novel

TOOLS and SOFTWARE

My Writing Nook (online text editor; free)

Bubbl.us (online mind map application; free)

Freemind (mind map application; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)

XMind (mind map application; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)

Liquid Story Binder (novel organization and writing software; free trial, $45.95; Windows, portable)

Scrivener (novel organization and writing software; free trial, $39.95; Mac)

SuperNotecard (novel organization and writing software; free trial, $29; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)

yWriter (novel organization and writing software; free; Windows, Linux, portable)

JDarkRoom (minimalist text editor; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)

AutoRealm (map creation software; free; Windows, Linux with Wine)

(via aliahatch)